Faculty - Arts and Letters/Humanities

Michigan State University Press
Romance and Classical Languages
Residential College in the Arts and Humanities
Department of Religious Studies
Department of English

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Michigan State University Press

Fredric Bohm

Fredric Bohm
Ph.D., History, Washington State University

Fredric Bohm, Professor of Writing and Rhetoric and Director Emeritus of Michigan State University Press, has spent most of his professional career in research and scholarly publishing. During his tenure at MSU Press (1990-2007), he developed a strong Canadian Studies publishing program as well as a significant Canada-U.S. cross-border book distribution system that included the university presses at Calgary, Alberta, Manitoba, the University of British Columbia, and also with Penumbra Press of Ottawa, Ontario.
E-mail:bohm@msu.edu

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Romance and Classical Languages

Christopher Scales

Safoi Babana-Hampton
Ph.D., University of Maryland

Dr. Babana-Hampton´s most recent book, Réflexions littéraires sur l´espace public marocain dans l´oeuvre d´Abdellatif Laâbi (Summa Publications, 2008), focuses on the work of eminent Moroccan writer Abdellatif Laâbi. Her publications also include articles and book chapters examining conceptions of multicultural citizenship, transnational identities and artistic hybridity in Francophone literary and filmic narratives from North Africa, the North African diaspora in France and Québec. Her current research project is a comparative study of images of multicultural citizenship in literary and filmic productions in the Maghreb and the Maghrebi diaspora in France.
Phone:(517)884-6311, e-mail:babanaha@msu.edu

Joseph Donohoe

Joseph Donohoe
Ph.D., History, Washington State University

Dr. Joseph Donohoe is a Professor Emeritus of Romance and Classical Languages.
e-mail:jdonohoe@msu.edu

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Residential College in the Arts and Humanities

Dylan A. T. Miner

Dylan A. T. Miner
Ph.D., History, Washington State University

Dylan A.T. Miner is a Wiisaakodewinini (Métis) artist, activist, and scholar. He is Director of American Indian Studies and Associate Professor at Michigan State University. Miner is also adjunct curator of Indigenous art at the MSU Museum and a founding member of the Justseeds artists collective. Miner holds a PhD from The University of New Mexico and has published approximately sixty journal articles, book chapters, critical essays, and encyclopedia entries. In 2010, he was granted an Artist Leadership Fellowship at the National Museum of the American Indian (Smithsonian Institution). Miner has been featured in more than twenty solo exhibitions – with five more planned in 2015-16 – and has been artist-in-residence at institutions such as the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, École supérieure des beaux-arts in Nantes, Klondike Institute of Art and Culture, Rabbit Island, Santa Fe Art Institute, and numerous universities, art schools, and low-residency MFA programs. His book Creating Aztlán: Chicano Art, Indigenous Sovereignty, and Lowriding Across Turtle Island was published in 2014 by the University of Arizona Press, while his solo exhibition Silence of Sovereignty opened this spring in Montréal. Miner is currently completing Indigenous Aesthetics: Art, Activism, Autonomy (Bloomsbury, expected 2016) and writing his first book of poetry, Ikidowinan Ninandagikendaanan (words I seek to learn).
Phone:(517)884-1323, e-mail:dminer@msu.edu
web: http://www.dylanminer.com
academia: https://michiganstate.academia.edu/DylanMiner

Patricia Rogers

Patricia Rogers
Ph.D., History, Michigan State University

Dr. Patricia Rogers' research interests focus on the role of Anglo-American merchants in defining and shaping the Atlantic world, the British Empire, and world history more broadly during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. A focus on the merchant community reveals aspects of the modern world such as cultural identity formation, commercial networks, and the flow of news. Patti's current academic projects include learning "new media" for use both in the classroom and in research. In addition to teaching in the RCAH, Patti serves as associate editor for H-Net (Humanities and Social Sciences Online) at MSU. In her spare time, she enjoys reading and needlework.
Phone:(517)884-1325, e-mail:rogerspa@msu.edu

Christopher Scales

Christopher Scales
Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. M.A., University of British Colombia.

Christopher Scales' research interests include traditional and contemporary Native American music, the North American popular music industry, and global indigenous political movements. His current research focuses on contemporary Northern powwow culture and musical creation both on the powwow grounds and in Aboriginal recording studios, specifically engaging the effects of technology and mass mediation on powwow performance aesthetics. Chris has also been active collaborating with indigenous musicians and has produced, recorded, or performed on several powwow and "Contemporary Native music" CD projects for Arbor Records and War Pony Records, independent record labels specializing in North American Aboriginal music. An active musician, he also performs southern Appalachian music on guitar, fiddle, mandolin, and banjo, as well as Shona mbira music from Zimbabwe, playing mbira dzavadzimu.
Phone:(517)884-6000, e-mail:scalesch@msu.edu

Anita Skeen

Anita Skeen
M.A., Bowling Green University

Dr. Anita Skeen is the author of four volumes of poetry, and her poetry, short fiction, and essays have appeared in numerous literary magazines and anthologies. She has completed a new volume of poetry, Never the Whole Story, begun while she was a Fellow at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and is working on a collection of short stories and a first novel. Anita is the director of the Creative Arts Festival and Writing Festival held annually at Ghost Ranch Conference Center in Abiquiu, New Mexico. She has taught in the MSU Study Abroad Program in England and Ireland, and served as a Visiting Writer and Writer-in Residence in numerous venues, most recently as the Sara Lura Matthews Self Writer in Residence at Converse College in Spartanburg, South Carolina, and as a Visiting Writer at the Mary Institute and St. Louis Country Day School in St. Louis, Missouri.
Phone:(517)432-2024, e-mail:skeen@msu.edu

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Department of Religious Studies

Mohammad Khalil

Mohammad Khalil
Ph.D., University of Michigan

Mohammad Hassan Khalil is an associate professor of Religious Studies, an adjunct professor of Law, and the interim director of the Muslim Studies Program. Before returning to his hometown of East Lansing, Michigan, he was an assistant professor of Religion and visiting professor of Law at the University of Illinois. He specializes in Islamic thought and is author of Islam and the Fate of Others: The Salvation Question (Oxford University Press, 2012) and editor of Between Heaven and Hell: Islam, Salvation, and the Fate of Others (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Dr. Khalil has presented papers at various national and international conferences, and has published peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters on various topics, from bioethics to early Islamic historiography to contemporary conversion narratives to soteriology to jihad.
Office: C731 Wells Hall, Phone:(517)884-4463, E-mail:khalilmo@msu.edu

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Department of English

Gordon Henry

Gordon Henry
An Anishinabe poet and novelist, Gordon Henry, Jr. is an enrolled member of the White Earth Chippewa Tribe of Minnesota.

His poetry has been published in anthologies such as Songs From This Earth On Turtle's Back: Contemporary American Indian Poetry (1983) and Returning the Gift: Poetry and Prose from the First Native American Writers(1994). His novel The Light People (1994) was awarded The American Book Award in 1995. He has also co-authored the textbook The Ojibway (2004), to which he contributed a number of essays on Native American culture.

Currently, Henry serves as the director of the creative writing program. He teaches courses in American literature, creative writing, and American Indian literature.
Office: 225B Morrill Hall, Phone:(517)355-7570, E-mail:henryg@msu.edu

Edward Watts

Edward Watts

Dr. Edward Watts is associate chairperson for undergraduate studies and a professor of English. His focus is American literature and studies before 1900, in the intersections of postcolonial theory, settler nationalism, border and frontier studies, and historical narrative. Currently, Dr. Watts is engaging book projects on race, violence, and madness on the frontier, as well as a comparative study of historical fiction and settler nationalism in the United States, the Confederacy, Canada, New Zealand, and Australia before 1914.
Office: 215 Morrill Hall, Phone:(517)432-0905, e-mail:wattse@msu.edu

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